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45. INVESTIGATING COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH, SLUMP AND COSTING OF CONCRETE MADE FROM PORTLAND LIMESTONE CEMENT OF GRADES 42.5 AND 32.5 by Ukala D.C.Volume 50 (March, 2019 Issue)
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INVESTIGATING COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH, SLUMP AND COSTING OF CONCRETE MADE FROM PORTLAND LIMESTONE CEMENT OF GRADES 42.5 AND 32.5

Ukala D.C.

Department of Civil Engineering, Delta State University, Abraka, P.M.B. 22, Oleh Campus, Nigeria.

Abstract

The confusion surrounding the effect of cement grades on the compressive strength of concrete has been a topic of discus for some time now. Nigerian Federal Government controlled bodies such as Standard Organization of Nigeria and Council for the Regulation of Engineering in Nigeria have put forward conflicting positions on these effects. While some studies are now concentrating their research towards this area, none to the best of this author’s knowledge has considered the slump and cost effects of using different Portland Limestone Cement (PLC) grades in concrete. This gap in knowledge is what this study focuses on. Concrete using PLC: Sand: Granite mix ratios of 1:1:2, 1:2:4, 1:3:6 and 1:4:8 were tested for slump at its fresh state and compressive strength at its hardened state. Two cement grades of 32.5 and 42.5 were used in producing concrete with w/c ratio of 0.5 and both concrete types were quantified in cost. As the mix ratio moved from 1:4:8 to 1:1:2 there was an overall increase in strength of 301% and 642% and an overall increase in slump of 135% and 82% for cement grade 42.5 and 32.4 concrete respectively while only a maximum strength and slump difference of 54.55% and 40% respectively when only the cement grade changed implying that concrete strength is more of a function of the mix ratio used than the cement grade. The results also show that the concrete made from cement grade 32.5 is more expensive than that made from cement grade 42.5 when targeting specific strengths.

Keywords: cement grades, compressive strength, mix ratios, slump, cost

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