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34. RADIOMETRIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF RAW WATER FROM RIVER OSUN PURIFIED FOR PUBLIC CONSUMPTION IN IJEBU-IGBO, SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA by Alausa S. K. and Ogunobi S. G.Volume 50 (March, 2019 Issue)
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RADIOMETRIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF RAW WATER FROM RIVER OSUN PURIFIED FOR PUBLIC CONSUMPTION IN IJEBU-IGBO, SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA

Alausa S. K1. and Ogunobi S. G2. 

Department of Physics, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria

Department of Science Laboratory Technology, Abraham Adesanya Polytechnic, Ijebu-Igbo, Ogun State, Nigeria 

Abstract

River Osun originates from Osogbo and passes Ijebu-Igbo that is situated on basement complex known to be rich in natural radionuclides. The aim of the study, therefore, is to determine the health impact assessment due to drinking the raw water and purified water. A total of 6 water samples were collected directly from the Osun River and 24 samples from the water taps at different locations in Ijebu-Igbo. The water samples were analysed using HPGe detector and the measured activity concentrations of 40K, 238U, 232Th and 226Ra were used to determine the effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risks due to the consumption of the raw and public water supply. The effective dose determined for three different age groups were 393±75 (adult), 196±38 (crèche) and 147±28µSv/y (infant) and 259±59 (adult), 129±29 (crèche) and 97±22 µSv/y (infant) for purified. The excess mortality cancer risks were 0.40±0.09 (adult), 0.2±0.04 and 0.15±0.03 (infant) for raw water and 0.21±0.05 (adult), 0.11±0.02 and 0.08±0.02 (infant) for purified water. The results indicated that the effective dose rates and cancer mortality risk due to the consumption of the water are low when compared to the world average values recommended by United Nation Scientific on Committee on Effect of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). 

Keywords: Radiometric assessment, drinking water, Ijebu-Igbo, Ogun State

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